La traditionnelle visite a la boulangerie, Today's Coolphoto

Today we met at the local boulagngerie in Burien, called Bakery Nouveau. We have a sandwich and talk about photography the way old friends do. It was a busy place on a fine morning. Look at those eyes.

Todays Coolphoto 20190425

The Traditional Trip To The Boulangerie (la traditionnelle visite à la boulangerie), Burien 2019
Original Date 2019
Print Date 2019
Size 11x9
Format Archival Pigment
Edition Open
Stamp On Back
Price $250


First Ever Photograph of a Human Being  — Boulevard du Temple  in Paris (1838) by Louis Daguerre. In the bottom left hand corner is a man who was having his shoes shined.

First Ever Photograph of a Human BeingBoulevard du Temple in Paris (1838) by Louis Daguerre. In the bottom left hand corner is a man who was having his shoes shined.

Back in the day when I was young and excited by the great photographs of the street I had seen, I stepped out the door to get some of the same. The shuffle and rhythm of past shooter’s footsteps echoed before me, along with the click of their shutters and their gasps of surprise.

Street Photography is the original focus of photography; its subject most quickly and easily captured and recognized. And even now, we look for those looks on the faces sent our way as we rush past.

For the next few days I’ll be showing my latest finds. I’ll be showing faces as they pass, and the wake of others that have already sailed by. I’ll be showing scenes that grabbed me by the shoulders and cried, “Did you see that? Did you SEE THAT!”

Vintage - I printed the photograph within a year of the original exposure.
Archival Pigment - Printed in my studio using computer technology with pigmented inks on acid and lignin free paper.
Silver - Printed in my darkroom on gelatin silver paper. These prints are double weight on a cotton fiber base.

Price does not include shipping or taxes.

Christopher Petrich is a photographer active in the Pacific Northwest. He is based in Tacoma Washington where he grew up and raised a family. Over his 50 year career he has worked on projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Japan as well as in 23 American states coast to coast. He has placed his work in corporate and private collections worldwide.  

Patti At The Piano, Today's Coolphoto

We retrieved this Gulbransen upright from the basement of my parents’ home where it had been since we moved in some 20 years before. What took eight hours for two men from the moving company to get in, my two friends and I got out in forty five minutes, door to door. The basement door was at the foot of a stairway ten feet below. The secret was to ask my father Jim, a naval architect and marine engineer, to look at it. “They had trouble because the piano was too big for the well and they spent all those hours lifting and turning it to fit into the door. Just build a platform to raise it about a foot above the floor of the well,” he said.

Worked like a champ. Thanks Dad, you’re brilliant!

Todays Coolphoto 20190424

Patti At The Piano, Tacoma, 1996, (Vintage Silver)
Print 18164
Original Date 1996
Print Date 2096
Size 10x8
Format Silver
Edition One Only
Stamp On Back
Price $625


First Ever Photograph of a Human Being  — Boulevard du Temple  in Paris (1838) by Louis Daguerre. In the bottom left hand corner is a man who was having his shoes shined.

First Ever Photograph of a Human BeingBoulevard du Temple in Paris (1838) by Louis Daguerre. In the bottom left hand corner is a man who was having his shoes shined.

Back in the day when I was young and excited by the great photographs of the street I had seen, I stepped out the door to get some of the same. The shuffle and rhythm of past shooter’s footsteps echoed before me, along with the click of their shutters and their gasps of surprise.

Street Photography is the original focus of photography; its subject most quickly and easily captured and recognized. And even now, we look for those looks on the faces sent our way as we rush past.

For the next few days I’ll be showing my latest finds. I’ll be showing faces as they pass, and the wake of others that have already sailed by. I’ll be showing scenes that grabbed me by the shoulders and cried, “Did you see that? Did you SEE THAT!”

Vintage - I printed the photograph within a year of the original exposure.
Archival Pigment - Printed in my studio using computer technology with pigmented inks on acid and lignin free paper.
Silver - Printed in my darkroom on gelatin silver paper. These prints are double weight on a cotton fiber base.

Price does not include shipping or taxes.

Christopher Petrich is a photographer active in the Pacific Northwest. He is based in Tacoma Washington where he grew up and raised a family. Over his 50 year career he has worked on projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Japan as well as in 23 American states coast to coast. He has placed his work in corporate and private collections worldwide.  

Street Smarts, Today's Coolphoto

This boy was lost in a physical reverie, trying to climb up the small slope on cardboard in stocking feet. He would slip and fall forward every time, over a dozen tries, until he saw me, and then he twirled around, only to drop onto his butt.

Todays Coolphoto 20190423

Pirouettes On Cardboard, Tacoma (2019)
Original Date 2019
Print Date 2019
Size 11x9
Format Archival Pigment
Edition Open
Stamp On Back
Price $250


The contrast between the dark gallery wall and the well-lit hall outside was compelling in its simplicity. Then the boy walked into my frame and transformed the image into beauty. I love this image.

Todays Coolphoto 20190423

The Boy deYoung, San Francisco (2014)
Original Date 2014
Print Date 2019
Size 11x9
Format Archival Pigment
Edition Open
Stamp On Back
Price $250


First Ever Photograph of a Human Being  — Boulevard du Temple  in Paris (1838) by Louis Daguerre. In the bottom left hand corner is a man who was having his shoes shined.

First Ever Photograph of a Human BeingBoulevard du Temple in Paris (1838) by Louis Daguerre. In the bottom left hand corner is a man who was having his shoes shined.

Back in the day when I was young and excited by the great photographs of the street I had seen, I stepped out the door to get some of the same. The shuffle and rhythm of past shooter’s footsteps echoed before me, along with the click of their shutters and their gasps of surprise.

Street Photography is the original focus of photography; its subject most quickly and easily captured and recognized. And even now, we look for those looks on the faces sent our way as we rush past.

For the next few days I’ll be showing my latest finds. I’ll be showing faces as they pass, and the wake of others that have already sailed by. I’ll be showing scenes that grabbed me by the shoulders and cried, “Did you see that? Did you SEE THAT!”

Vintage - I printed the photograph within a year of the original exposure.
Archival Pigment - Printed in my studio using computer technology with pigmented inks on acid and lignin free paper.
Silver - Printed in my darkroom on gelatin silver paper. These prints are double weight on a cotton fiber base.

Price does not include shipping or taxes.

Christopher Petrich is a photographer active in the Pacific Northwest. He is based in Tacoma Washington where he grew up and raised a family. Over his 50 year career he has worked on projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Japan as well as in 23 American states coast to coast. He has placed his work in corporate and private collections worldwide.  

Today's CoolPhoto 4/19/2019



The only route to the south end of Vashon Island is by ferry from Point Defiance to Tahlequah. For a young family, the ride represented a cheap outing and a chance to be on the water in summer. The passage is deep, over 90 fathoms at one point en route, and over the years we have seen whales and dolphins swim near as we crossed. We crossed on the ferry Hiyu in 1982.

Todays Coolphoto 20190419

On The Ferry To Vashon, Tacoma, 1982, (Silver)
Print 18163
Original Date 1982
Print Date 2008
Size 10x8
Format Silver
Edition One Only
Stamp On Back
Price $625


Vintage - I printed the photograph within a year of the original exposure.
Archival Pigment - Printed in my studio using computer technology with pigmented inks on acid and lignin free paper.
Silver - Printed in my darkroom on gelatin silver paper. These prints are double weight on a cotton fiber base.

Price does not include shipping or taxes.

Christopher Petrich is a photographer active in the Pacific Northwest. He is based in Tacoma Washington where he grew up and raised a family. Over his 50 year career he has worked on projects in Europe, the Middle East, and Japan as well as in 23 American states coast to coast. He has placed his work in corporate and private collections worldwide.  

Today's CoolPhoto 4/14/2019

VINTAGE SILVER

Stamped and noted on back. One only.

This is a childhood friend named Jim Coblentz. We were out at Fox Island at my family’s beach place. I think he reminds me of Dwalin from Lord Of the Rings.

Vintage - I printed the photograph within a year of the original exposure.
Archival Pigment - Printed in my studio using computer technology with pigmented inks on acid and lignin free paper.
Silver - Printed in my darkroom on gelatin silver paper. These prints are double weight on a cotton fiber base.

Price does not include shipping or taxes.

Note: Many customers have told me that they prefer loose prints for their collection since they store their fine prints in a box with tissue interleaving. Assuming this, I will ship without overmat, unless you request otherwise.

Today's CoolPhoto 4/13/2019

VINTAGE SILVER

Title: Man Strolling Beneath A Cherry Tree in Wright Park, Tacoma (Vintage Silver)
Date Of Image: 1994
Date Of Print:
1994
Size: 10x8
Format: Vintage Silver
Price $625

Vintage - I printed the photograph within a year of the original exposure.
Archival Pigment - Printed in my studio using computer technology with pigmented inks on acid and lignin free paper.
Silver - Printed in my darkroom on gelatin silver paper. These prints are double weight on a cotton fiber base.

Price does not include shipping or taxes.

The Art Of It - What Do You See?

When my friends talk photography there is no end to theorizing why it is art, and why it always seems to miss being ART. Such has always been the case from the beginning nearly two hundred years ago. The first photographic process — heliography — was invented around 1824 by Nicéphore Niépce.

Over lunch at the Office tavern down the street a few weeks ago my friend Dave and I renewed the discussion. I said it comes down to the one thing that is true for all people viewing photographs, which is the one question always relevant, always appropriate, always timely.

What do you see?

Leigh, Malibu (2019)

Leigh, Malibu (2019)

A photograph presents itself as something whole and entire within a frame. It prompts people to make sense of it, to tell the story of it. And not just any story but the only story that matters; it is the story of what we see based on the life we have lived. Sometimes aided by a caption, we want to complete a photograph by filling in its background, and doubly so if there is a person in the frame. We want to know just who it is and what she is doing.

We have eyes to see; this is the most basic of our sensations. The artfulness of a photograph draws you to it and into it, capturing your eye and captivating your imagination so that you want to keep looking, and wondering, hey, what’s going on there?

A photograph stands outside of our consciousness as the world itself does. Therefore when we create a photograph we are putting what is outside, inside. When we see a photograph we are moved to tell the story particular to the only thing we can truly speak of with absolute authority, ourselves.

So when I am with someone who is looking at one of my photographs, I ask.

What do you see?

Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2019

This photograph is an homage to the famous painting by Edvard Munk. The boy was completely candid, not blinking for a second as he bellowed “DAD!” across the quiet late winter afternoon. He wasn’t upset so much as driven by ambition to skate home by himself while his father and younger brother trailed behind. As part of the fun I slipped a couple of ghost images of the famous painting into the photograph. However, they are buried so deep you’d have to have the original to detect them. I’m not saying where they are…that’s your puzzle and my fun.

This is the first image of a collection I submitted to the Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2019 The entire submission is here.

The Scream, Tacoma (2019) ©2019 Christopher Petrich

The Scream, Tacoma (2019) ©2019 Christopher Petrich

Leica Oskar Barnack Award 2019 is open to professional photographers annually. It is enormously prestigious, paying a huge sum of twenty five thousand euros. Photographers world-wide submit up to twelve thematically consistent images, of which only twelve are chosen from all submissions.

My feelings notwithstanding, I expect this work isn’t groundbreaking. Yet, the act of assembling a collection to compete at the top level distills the best of my efforts. Along with the photographs a very short statement of no more than 900 characters is required.

This is the statement I submitted: “The world is in a shooting war and the armies wear no uniforms. On every continent, the threat of annihilation is either implied or explicit, by bullet or by bomb, even in my home town, and everyone is suspect. For more than 40 years I have walked the streets peering into faces, seeing those masked to hide the fear of death. But there is something else that comes unguarded too. Hope and courage emerge as a thread and if you watch for it, it will come out straight and true. These are some of these images from the last couple of years.”

Cry For Pizza, New York ©2019 Christopher Petrich

Cry For Pizza, New York ©2019 Christopher Petrich

Oskar Barnack (1879–1936) invented the Leica camera. This is the legendary instrument used to great effect by the world’s renowned photographers since it was invented in the first part of the twentieth century. The Leica is built tough and small enough to fit your hands, and has the finest optics by far for any camera system now or then.

I have two of them, both digital M models, which I have used exclusively for ten years.

From the awards website: “Entry submissions must be a self-contained series of images in which the photographer perceives and documents the interaction between man and the environment with acute vision and contemporary visual style – creative, groundbreaking and innovative.”

Source: https://coolphoto.com/?p#/gallery-oskar-ba...

A Fair Weather Gale In The Channel Islands; A Ship Saling East To China.

There was a big system forecast, and we woke to 45 mile per hour winds with bright, clear blue skies and temperatures in the 40’s. The waves rolled in before the wind, six foot swells that churned up the beach and washed it away.

Across to the horizon great ocean cargo ships, loaded deep and stacked high with containers, headed east out of LA and past Santa Catalina, with a straight shot to China across the central Pacific.

This ship is a member of the NYK Line, the name painted on the hull in enormous letters and visible in the picture below. I’m sure I could find out where it was headed that day, and what it carried. I’d rather just let it go.

NYK Line container ship headed east out of Los Angeles through the Channel Islands in a fair weather gale ©2019 Christopher Petrich

NYK Line container ship headed east out of Los Angeles through the Channel Islands in a fair weather gale ©2019 Christopher Petrich

Super Snow Moon Coming Into SeaTac Over Rainier

On Monday this week flying home from Los Angeles, we saw from our window the moon at it's closest orbit. Its size was a shock, flying with us mile after mile smiling a celestial welcome. We lost it when we dropped below the clouds, but the sight of our wings brushing the top of the great mountain at sunset, with the goddess of the night sky smiling down was a vision of grace.

“In other words, it’s a full moon near perigee, or closest to Earth for this month. This February 2019 full moon reaches its exact full phase closer to the time of perigee than any other full moon this year. Hence the year’s closest supermoon.“

The Super Snow Moon of February over Mt Rainier from the seat of a Horizon Air  Embraer 175  ©2019 Christopher Petrich

The Super Snow Moon of February over Mt Rainier from the seat of a Horizon Air Embraer 175 ©2019 Christopher Petrich

The Last Day It Snowed

It was coming down in a torrent of frying pan flakes. The air was heating up even as the earth was on its way to the dark side. We were fixed at the window watching it pile up on the back deck. I put out a fancy blue T square ruler which metered the rising drift edging to thirteen inches. This was the fifth day of cold and snow, and it turned out that the fifth was the last. Five days was enough. I had to get out.

Even though it was warming up, the snow was still cold and dry. People wandered the streets in a general state of marvel. A tiny parade of two marched down the middle of 29th street a few blocks from home. A young woman in a bright red hat under a Seattle Times golf umbrella, holding a bright blue insulated mug was shouting, “This hasn’t happened since nineteen thirty two!” She led a young man step for step while he formed a snowball behind her. He was silent, but amused, and he glanced toward me with a smile.

It’s true this sort of weather is rare enough around here to warrant such a startled cry of amazement. To them, young and probably new to the city, this really was news.

The story of snow in the Pacific Northwest made headlines around the world, but it is melting away. But now the story is of mud and the threat of landslides across the whole of Puget Sound, and that has not happened here, at that scale, since nineteen thirty two.

Making A Snowball With A Wry Glance, Tacoma, On The Last Day It Snowed, February 2019

Making A Snowball With A Wry Glance, Tacoma, On The Last Day It Snowed, February 2019

An Early Winter Afternoon and Girls At The Spar Cafe

On an early winter afternoon a low sun lit the window of the Spar Cafe and the long table next to it. Three school girls were at the table in constant motion. One waved hello, the others too noticed me.

It was a look at the next generation coming to the plate, full of life, and happy about it. Let’s hope they remain free to do good, treasuring one another as the great prize, the exceedingly rare true friend.

I was happy they felt free to say hello, on that fine early winter afternoon.

GirlsAtTheSpar1.jpg
GirlsAtTheSpar2.jpg
GirlsAtTheSpar3.jpg

The Young Woman and the Question Remained.

We traversed stairs, turnstiles and hallways to arrive here, and we stood on the platform for the F train to Brooklyn.

Those tunnels are a deep dark hole, but the light and the tiles on the platform held back the darkness. I saw a tableau playing out in the greasy noise across the open tracks down there.

a1NY_Subway37.jpg

Four squares of light were framed by steel columns holding up the tunnel, and under those four proscenium arches people hesitated or stopped, or moved on quickly.

One person stayed and engaged men somehow, getting them to stop while she listened, and then they would move away, seeming to go about their business without a second thought.

And the question remained, what did she ask them?

Call for Entry: Self Portrait

Some photographers can’t resist the temptation to turn the camera on themselves. I’ve photographed myself many times over the years. I like a plain, straight photograph generally, and this holds true for pictures I take of me just as well as for pictures I take of others.

Here is my current response to the call for Self Portraits from PhotoPlace Gallery in Vermont.

Shadow In and Shadow Out, 2018 ©Christopher Petrich

Shadow In and Shadow Out, 2018 ©Christopher Petrich

Photographer Before The Lights, 1973

Photographer Before The Lights, 1973

White HaIr; Black Rims, 2018

White HaIr; Black Rims, 2018

Towelled Male Torso, Late Afternoon, 1996

Towelled Male Torso, Late Afternoon, 1996

We photographers long for an audience for our photographs, and across the imaging landscape there are hundreds of Calls For Entry, I look for calls from the PhotoPlace Gallery. They understand photography and a photographer’s desire to publish, and they are particularly good at choosing curators who know a good picture when they see one. I’ve had success showing there; they make it fun.

Care for ICE with your drink?

Just east of downtown Tacoma, over the famed black steel bridge above the Thea Foss Waterway, the streets fan out past warehouses, abandoned industrial sites, petroleum staging plants, and the Northwest Detention Center.

©2018 Christopher Petrich

©2018 Christopher Petrich

The NWDC holds undocumented people rounded up by ICE for deportation. It is a private prison on port land keeping the sorrows and disappointments of the imprisoned hidden there. But feelings about this clearly show on a junk rail car close by the prison.

Dozens of pallets with their payloads wrapped in plastic lay next to the car. These bundles together look like ice flows jammed up against a frozen shore.

Y asi se va

And so it goes.